Constraints facing the COVID-19 Technology Access Pool (C-TAP)

Production concerns in the manufacturing of COVID-19 vaccines have underscored the need for technology transfer. This means greater relevance for the C-TAP, however, it continues to lack support.

The shortages of COVID-19 vaccines have brought into focus the importance of technology transfer needed to speed up the production of vaccines to meet unmet demand. This may give a much-needed impetus to WHO’s COVID-19 Technology Access Pool, which was first suggested by Costa Rica in March 2020, subsequently launched in May 2020 by WHO, but an initiative that has failed to take off. So far.

Image credit: Photo by Ann H from Pexels

BEST-LAID PLANS

In a letter sent in March 2020, President of Costa Rica, Carlos Alvarado, WHO to “undertake an effort to pool rights to technologies that are useful for the detection, prevention, control and treatment of the COVID-19 pandemic.” The letter called for a voluntary mechanism where those who own intellectual property (IP) and data and know-how relevant to the development and manufacture of diagnostic tests, devices, medicines, or vaccines would contribute knowledge and pool in their information on a shared platform.

SO WHAT IS HOLDING C-TAP BACK?

ACT A Vs C-TAP

WHAT WILL IT TAKE TO GET THE C-TAP GOING?

Experts say that the C-TAP will need high-level backers for it to take off. A source pointed out that when the Medicines Patent Pool was launched, it received its first license from the United States National Institutes of Health (NIH) for patents related to a HIV medicine. “It was an important signal, back then,” the source said.

--

--

Get the Medium app

A button that says 'Download on the App Store', and if clicked it will lead you to the iOS App store
A button that says 'Get it on, Google Play', and if clicked it will lead you to the Google Play store
Geneva Health Files

Geneva Health Files

A newsletter from the capital of global health, reporting on politics, policies and power.